Is Blogging A Threat to Quality Writing?

Literary expression takes many forms; from short stories to expanded documentation covering myriad subjects.  Throughout history, authors have set themselves apart offering written works as diverse as romantic novels and epic tales of adventure, spanning several volumes.  Within each genre, sub-specialists write in styles running the gamut from concise academic form, to sprawling embellishments of everyday encounters.  Thanks to technology and the proliferation of the World Wide Web, there is a relatively new player on the field, begging the question:  Are bloggers a threat to literary integrity?

Motivation Dictates Value

Before people had pencils and pens, drawings and symbols left on cave walls were effective communication.  So who took responsibility for preserving thoughts in this way?  The cave people skilled at drawing most likely bore much of the burden, but lesser illustrators surely weighed in too.  As communication became more important to society, formalizing language and alphabets, more and more people took up writing as a form of expression.  Early writers were not necessarily highly-skilled. But they wrote anyway, because they could. So the slippery slope of unskilled writers sharing ideas, whether or not they have the slightest clue how to do it properly, is nothing new.

It could even be argued that the same motivation existed for cave drawers as for some of today’s bloggers.  Fame and recognition, the desire to be heard and remembered, are motivators for taking pens to paper, charcoal to cave walls, and most recently, fingertips to keyboards.  What has changed over time is the relative importance of fame, heightened in an information age placing great emphasis on celebrity and adulation.

The evolution of the World Wide Web continues to change the landscape for fame-seekers.  An instant audience, perhaps millions, is a powerful draw for those committed to being noticed.  As a result, many bloggers put the cart before the horse; adding to the blogosphere, before they really have something to say.  Blogging’s greatest threat to quality writing is found among ‘vanity’ blogs, serving only their authors; rather than informative, relevant content shared by capable writers blogging online.

Blog Economics

In addition to personal rewards for bloggers, the practice of sharing online carries cash benefits, once bloggers establish followings.  Unfortunately, poorly written blogs yield returns for bloggers able to draw traffic, in spite of themselves.  When poor content is rewarded with cash, it might appear as though it undermines quality writing, but it may be too soon to judge.

Blogging is an evolving pursuit, subject to corrections as it matures into a long-term phenomenon. And just as competition influences other economic trends, bloggers face free market influences, which may eventually serve to elevate good writing and take incentives away from bloggers spewing drivel.

Purely promotional blog content, disguised as education, is increasingly being called-out for what it is, filtering-out blogs without intrinsic value. Spam gives blogs a bad name, but it also makes legitimate content shine amid the noise.  In other words, bloggers with something meaningful to share will prevail, but only with a firm commitment to high quality content, and perseverance sharing their messages.

Discouraging signs may show themselves in the short-term, but blogging is not a threat to quality writing over the long haul.

 

This guest post is contributed by Rebecca Gray, who writes for Backgroundchecks.org. She welcomes your comments at her email: GrayRebecca14@gmail.com

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Could Writing Your Own Story Help You Sort Out Problems?

By Ken Myers

Many people will use literature in order to find solutions to real life problems. Stories involving similar situations have a way of lending insight to problems we face on a daily basis. For those who are unable to adjust to social changes or opposition, reading about them has a way of making emotional and mental connections. Along with reading about these circumstances, could writing your own story help you develop a deeper connection to how you can resolve problems in a healthy way?

First-Person Narrative – Writing in the first person provides the reader with a sense that the story is being told from the individual experiencing the problems. When you read your own material based on true situations, you step outside of yourself and gain a different perspective of your own thoughts. Even if you change the names and places in order to protect others, the entire experience could create understanding beyond what someone else can try to explain to you. Not only are you processing the information from your own point of view, you can then examine yourself as the narrator for the story.

Third-Person Storytelling – One of the most common methods of writing is the use of a third-person point of view. This is when you are telling the story of someone else. This can help you in the same method as mentioned in first-person as you are constructing the story based on your own experiences. Using this method of writing can disassociate you from the situation. However, reading over your own work can put things into perspective based on what your characters perceive. How would each person in your story react to the actions your main character has committed? Are you able to put yourself in their shoes in this manner?

Character Development – One of the hardest parts about writing your story as a form of therapy is the understanding of human emotions within others. You need to have a sense of empathy in order to really give your characters life. While you may think this is absurd, it can greatly help you comprehend the consequences of your actions. Your behavior impacts more than just yourself. Each time you make a decision, everyone around you is affected – and more consequential actions could involve the people around those individuals. It could be a detailed interconnecting web that can alter the lifestyle of so many people.

Honesty – Another difficult aspect of writing your story is the ability to be honest with yourself. You can lie to others if you wish, but you can never lie to yourself. Writing your story in an honest method is the only way to really connect to the issues and make progress towards sorting out your problems. It takes a great deal of courage in order to look inside oneself and realize the problems he or she has. You are the only one that can truly sort out what is going on inside yourself. As long as you are honest with yourself, you could gain a great deal of wisdom to help overcome virtually any situation.

Many people will keep journals of their lives in order to express their emotions about situations throughout any given day. It is one thing to describe a day in this manner, but it’s completely different when you’re telling a tale with a solid plot that you need to address. Even if you don’t plan on showing your writing to everyone, at least keep it for yourself to help reflect on problems you face throughout your life.

 

Ken Myers is a father, husband, and entrepreneur. He has combined his passion for helping families find in-home care with his experience to build a business. Learn more about him by visiting @KenneyMyers on Twitter.